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Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren keep pointing to the record level of income inequality in the United States, the highest it has been since the Census Bureau started measuring it 50 years ago, and, in reaction, defenders of the plutocracy throw penalty flags.

Paul Volcker’s leadership of the Federal Reserve was enormously consequential. The former chairman — who died Sunday in New York at the age of 92, according to the New York Times — bequeathed to his heirs and the global economy two major legacies: one from which subsequent Fed chiefs benefit…

In today’s information age, the average person can empower himself or herself with knowledge like never before. But there is one notable exception: Most Americans have no idea what a health care service costs before they get it. If we expect to lower health care costs, that must change.

There has been a clamor for the U.S. government to spend more on research and development. Economic theories such as those of Paul Romer, who won the Nobel prize in 2018, suggest that spending more on R&D would promote long-term economic growth. A growing number of economists also believ…

French President Emmanuel Macron recently declared that “we are experiencing the brain death of NATO.” He made this remark in support of longstanding French policy favoring a more united Europe less dependent for its security on American leadership and protection.

As the decade winds down and we assess how the economy did, two things stand out: productivity growth has been disappointing since the Great Recession and yet economic growth hasn’t been all that bad, compounding at a 2.3% annual rate. But we’ve only been able to manage that level of growth …

Rush Limbaugh could hardly contain his excitement. “We’ve got three polls today showing Donald Trump at 30 percent or higher with black voters,” he told his national radio audience Monday. “We’ve got Emerson, we’ve got Rasmussen and we’ve got Marist!”

In 1217, two years after England’s King John signed the Magna Carta, King Henry III agreed to a companion document, the Charter of the Forest. Royalty, nobles and the clergy were at odds over claims to land that had once been shared by all. The charter intervened, codifying the concept of pu…