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ASTORIA, Ore. (AP) — Oregon wildlife managers are considering updates to the state's elk management strategy, officials said.

New guidance developed by the state will likely be folded into strategy for North Coast cities grappling with conflicts between residents and elk, The Astorian newspaper reported Monday.

Communities such as Gearheart and Warrenton northwest of Portland are struggling with a growing elk population in increasingly urban areas.

In late May, an elk that was protecting her newborn calf charged at people and cars in Hammond, a part of Warrenton, and had to be tranquilized and relocated.

State troopers normally euthanize elk, while the Department of Fish and Wildlife is tasked with darting and relocation, officials said.

Herman Biederbeck, a state wildlife biologist, is developing updated guidelines for wildlife staff responding to emergency situations.

"What we hope to do with this guidance document is just to identify some general areas where elk can be relocated in these crisis situations," Biederbeck said.

The state may begin using radio collars on animals, he said.

"Just to see where they move to or how long it takes for them to find people again," Biederbeck said.

Democratic Gov. Kate Brown approved a project in April for municipalities, property owners and other parties to work on elk options with Oregon Solutions, which assists community problem-solving projects.

"We're going through this process to create a toolkit so we can have something to enact as a policy that's acceptable to everyone at the table," said Warrenton Mayor Henry Balensifer.

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Information from: The Daily Astorian, http://www.dailyastorian.com

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